Recent Fire Damage Posts

Repair Fire Damage Quickly!

2/8/2019 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Repair Fire Damage Quickly! Mitigation Over Replacing

Fire damage and a fire loss can be repaired by a fire cleanup crew in a few short days and it is faster to contact the commercial fire damage company when the fire is still raging (After you have called Emergency Services first). Our fire damage repair crew will arrive on the scene and immediately begin the process of repairing the home. There are fire problems you may not expect to be as severe as they actually are as well as other issues most homeowners don't even consider that have nothing to do with the actual fire. For example, if the Fire Department came to your house and had to use a hose to douse the flames you will have some amount of water damage.

Remember: Mitigation Over Replacing

  • Cost Effective. It is by far cheaper and easier to clean an item than it is to replace it. The Faster SERVPRO can respond to your damage the higher the chance we can save some of your personal items.
  • Preserve Air Quality. The longer ash and soot lingers in the air the more it becomes hazardous to your health. 
  • Keep The Smell Out. If SERVPRO can get to the scene soon after the damage occurs it is possible to prevent the permanent smell of burning from seeping into clothes and furniture.
  • Prevent Mold. If water was poured onto the fire it stands to reason it soaked your floors and appliances. Left untreated it becomes a perfect breeding ground for mold. 
  • Save Time. Believe it or not, the longer damage sits it becomes worse, even if you think its as bad as its going to get. The worse a job is the longer it takes to clean up. Still, it is always faster to repair than it is to build anew. 
  • Peace of Mind. The faster your life gets back to normal the less amount of stress is put on your body and mind. Fewer days laying awake at night in a place that isn't your own. Less stress equals a healthier and happier life. You can also rest assured the job was/is being done properly so there are no issues down the line because of cutting corners.

When you have fire damage it feels like your life is going up in flames. Breath (just not in the smoke). SERVPRO of Friendswood/Pearland will come to the rescue and do what we do best. Make it "Like it never even happened." or better!

Can You Inspect a Fire Extinguisher?

2/8/2019 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Can You Inspect a Fire Extinguisher? In the event of a fire emergency, first make sure to get people safely away, then call 911.

When was the last time you took the time to check the fire extinguisher that sits under your kitchen sink? Or the one hanging from a rusty hook in your garage? If you’re struggling to remember, it’s time to check it. Like any other piece of safety equipment, a home fire extinguisher should be inspected regularly to ensure it’s in proper working condition. A fire extinguisher in good working condition is your first line of defense when a home fire erupts.

Ideally, you should inspect your portable home fire extinguishers every month.

For the visual guide click here.

Tips for Performing a Monthly Fire Extinguisher Check

Check the label or tag.

Every fire extinguisher, whether disposable or rechargeable, has a manufacturer’s label or tag. Read the tag and follow the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance suggestions.

Check the tamper seal.

If the tamper seal has been broken or is cracked, a disposable fire extinguisher needs to be replaced. If it’s rechargeable, it needs to be serviced professionally. Check the locking or pull pin as well to make sure it’s in the correct position. If the pin missing, the fire extinguisher needs to be inspected or serviced by a professional.

Inspect for physical damage.

Physically inspect the fire extinguisher for obvious damage. This may include but is not limited to dents, corrosion, cracks and obvious leakage. If a fire extinguisher has leakage, it’s no longer under full pressure and may not work properly when you need it most. Check the fire extinguisher nozzle as well, to ensure it’s not clogged by grime, dust, bugs or leakage from the unit itself.

Check the pressure gauge.

Check that the pressure gauge needle indicates the fire extinguisher pressure is in the optimum operating range. Often the correct pressure range will be designated by green on the gauge.

Is the fire extinguisher full?

During your monthly check, lift the fire extinguisher and determine if it still feels full. If there has been a leak, it will feel light, and it won’t have the right amount of pressure to work correctly.

Shake it.

If you have a dry chemical fire extinguisher, it should be shaken once a month during your inspection. This helps prevent the chemical dousing agent from solidifying at the bottom of the unit.

Write the inspection date on the tag.

Keep track of every inspection date by writing it on the fire extinguisher tag.

Ensure easy access to your fire extinguisher.

Fire extinguishers should always be easy to access if there is an emergency. You don’t want to have to search for it once a fire breaks out. Don’t block fire extinguishers with furniture, boxes or any other items. Everyone who lives in the household should know where the closest fire extinguisher is located and how to use it in case of an emergency.

In the event of a fire emergency, first make sure to get people safely away, then call 911. A home fire extinguisher can be used to put out or control small fires, but it’s still safest to call professional firefighters before you attempt to control a fire on your own. If you need professional fire, smoke and water damage cleanup, and remediation after a fire, call the experts at SERVPRO of Friendswood/Pearland. 281-412-6211

Don't Overload Your Room's Electrical Outlets

1/29/2019 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Don't Overload Your Room's Electrical Outlets Don't use too many multi-plug devices.

Most electrical outlets are designed to handle a specific amperage. It’s best not to try to push them to their capacity by using too many multi-plug devices. If you ever notice any scorched marks or burning odors around an electrical outlet, stop using that outlet and inform someone of the problem right away.

Overloaded circuit warning signs:

  • Flickering, blinking, or dimming lights
  • Frequently tripped circuit breakers or blown fuses
  • Warm or discolored wall plates
  • Cracking, sizzling, or buzzing from receptacles
  • Burning order coming from receptacles or wall switches
  • Mild shock or tingle from appliances, receptacles, or switches

How to prevent electrical overloads:

  • Never use extension cords or multi-outlet converters for appliances
  • All major appliances should be plugged directly into a wall receptacle outlet. Only plug one heat-producing appliance into a receptacle outlet at a time
  • A heavy reliance on extension cords is an indication that you have too few outlets to address your needs. Have a qualified electrician inspect your home and add new outlets
  • Power strips only add additional outlets; they do not change the amount of power being received from the outlet

Have Questions? Call Us Today –

(713) 472-4162

Smoke Alarms

12/28/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Smoke Alarms Smoke alarms save lives.

There are two kinds of alarms. Ionization smoke alarms are quicker to warn about flaming fires. Photoelectric alarms are quicker to warn about smoldering fires. It is best to use both types of alarms in the home.

Install smoke alarms inside and outside each bedroom and sleeping area and make sure everyone in the home knows what to do if the alarm sounds.

Install alarms on every level of the home. Large homes may need extra smoke alarms.

It is best to use interconnected smoke alarms when one smoke alarm sounds they all sound.

A smoke alarm should be on the ceiling or high on a wall. Keep smoke alarms away from the kitchen to reduce false alarms. They should be at least 10 feet from the stove.

People who are hard-of-hearing or deaf can use special alarms equipped with strobe lights and bed shakers.

Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years, and test the batteries once a month.

SERVPRO of Friendswood/Pearland knows the ins and outs of fire safety, but sometimes even the most safety-conscience can face tragedy. If you've had fire damage in your home, large or small, call 281-412-6211 for 24-hour service.

Holiday Mishaps

12/28/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Holiday Mishaps Test smoke alarms monthly and replace after 10 years.

The winter season is fast approaching! The days are getting shorter and the temperatures are getting lower here in Southeast Texas. It’s almost time to start breaking out the portable space heaters and firing up those fireplaces and wood burning stoves.

Did you know?

According to the National Fire Protection Association, heating equipment is responsible for an estimated $893 million in property damage annually? Heating is the second leading cause of residential-fire deaths. Those of us here at SERVPRO of Friendswood/Pearland, in conjunction with the NFPA have put together a few tips to reduce the risk of a heating-related fire and to keep your homes and families safe this winter.

  • Keep anything flammable at least three feet from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or a portable space heater. Have a three-foot “kid & pet-free zone” around open fires and space heaters.
  • Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.
  • Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel-burning space heaters.
  • Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cool before putting them in a metal container for disposal. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home.
  • Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional.
  • Have a qualified professional install stationary space heating equipment, water heaters or central heating equipment according to the local codes and manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Test smoke alarms monthly and replace after 10 years.

If you or someone you know has fire damage in your home, large or small, call Kimberly at 281-520-8197 for 24-hour service.  SERVPRO of Friendswood/Pearland is at your service. 

Don't Overload Your Room's Electrical Outlets

12/26/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Don't Overload Your Room's Electrical Outlets Don't use too many multi-plug devices.

Most electrical outlets are designed to handle a specific amperage. It’s best not to try to push them to their capacity by using too many multi-plug devices. If you ever notice any scorched marks or burning odors around an electrical outlet, stop using that outlet and inform someone of the problem right away.

Overloaded circuit warning signs:

  • Flickering, blinking, or dimming lights
  • Frequently tripped circuit breakers or blown fuses
  • Warm or discolored wall plates
  • Cracking, sizzling, or buzzing from receptacles
  • Burning order coming from receptacles or wall switches
  • Mild shock or tingle from appliances, receptacles, or switches

How to prevent electrical overloads:

  • Never use extension cords or multi-outlet converters for appliances
  • All major appliances should be plugged directly into a wall receptacle outlet. Only plug one heat-producing appliance into a receptacle outlet at a time
  • A heavy reliance on extension cords is an indication that you have too few outlets to address your needs. Have a qualified electrician inspect your home and add new outlets
  • Power strips only add additional outlets; they do not change the amount of power being received from the outlet

Have Questions? Call Us Today –

(713) 472-4162

SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES: HERE’S WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW

10/19/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES: HERE’S WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW Smoke alarms are a key part of a home fire escape plan.

There are two kinds of alarms. Ionization smoke alarms are quicker to warn about flaming fires. Photoelectric alarms are quicker to warn about smoldering fires. It is best to use both types of alarms in the home.

Install smoke alarms inside and outside each bedroom and sleeping area and make sure everyone in the home knows what to do if the alarm sounds.

Install alarms on every level of the home. Large homes may need extra smoke alarms.

It is best to use interconnected smoke alarms when one smoke alarm sounds they all sound.

A smoke alarm should be on the ceiling or high on a wall. Keep smoke alarms away from the kitchen to reduce false alarms. They should be at least 10 feet from the stove.

People who are hard-of-hearing or deaf can use special alarms equipped with strobe lights and bed shakers.

Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years, and test the batteries once a month.

SERVPRO of Friendswood/Pearland knows the ins and outs of fire safety, but sometimes even the most safety-conscience can face tragedy. If you've had a fire damage in your home, large or small, call Kimberly at 281-520-8197 for 24-hour service.

Electrical Fires

10/18/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Electrical Fires Some electrical fires happen because of problems in house wiring or appliance failure.

When an electrical fire happens most people are taken by surprise. It usually happens from a simple act done a hundred times before such as turning on a light switch or plugging in your phone, but this time it causes sparks to fly. There are few tells to look for indicating a fire is imminent. Yet with today's safety standards in modern-day products, electrical fires happen so rarely even when we push the wiring to its limit that we are lured into a false sense of security.

Remember To Look For:

Frayed Wiring- There is always that one cell phone charger that seems to pull at the ends and become frayed. The wiring may be exposed but you continue to use it anyway because it still works. Please don't. The exposed wiring could spark at any time and cause a fire that would be much more expensive to pay for over buying a new charger.

Old Wiring- In between the walls of every home runs a maze of circuitry and copper wiring. All homes are built to code with plenty of electrical charges to sustain modern appliances. As time goes on and we invent bigger, better, and more energy consuming products it becomes harder for the old wiring to keep up.

Overpopulated Extension Cords- During the holiday season, this becomes the most common fire hazard. It is also the most common cause of fires during the month of December. 

High Wattage Bulbs- Every lamp comes with a little warning label informing the owner of the highest wattage it can safely use. Do not stick any bulb in a light fixture because it fits. 

Space Heaters- The most common cause of a household fire occurring because of these is due to the nature of how easy it is to light fabrics on fire. Keep space heaters away from curtains and organic products.

Electrical Fires

2/19/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Electrical Fires Please unplug appliances and chargers not in use

When an electrical fire happens most people are taken by surprise. It usually happens from a simple act done a hundred times before such as turning on a light switch or plugging in your phone, but this time it causes sparks to fly. There are few tells to look for indicating a fire is eminent. Yet with today's safety standards in modern day products, electrical fires happen so rarely even when we push the wiring to its limit that we are lured into a false sense of security.

Remember To Look For:

Frayed Wiring- There is always that one cellphone charger that seems to pull at the ends and become frayed. The wiring may be exposed but you continue to use it anyways because it still works. Please don't. The exposed wiring could spark at anytime and cause a fire that would be much more expensive to pay for over buying a new charger.

Old Wiring- In between the walls of every home runs a maze of circuitry and copper wiring. All homes are built to code with plenty of electrical charge to sustain modern appliances. As time goes on and we invent bigger, better, and more energy consuming products it becomes harder for the old wiring to keep up.

Overpopulated Extension Cords- During the holiday season this becomes the most common fire hazard. It is also the most common cause of fires during the month of December. 

High Wattage Bulbs- Every lamp comes with a little warning label informing the owner of the highest wattage it can safely use. Do not stick any bulb in a light fixture because it fits. 

Space Heaters- The most common cause of a household fire occurring because of these is due to the nature of how easily it is to light fabrics on fire. Keep space heaters away from curtains and organic products.

Why Repair Fire Damage So Quickly?

2/8/2018 (Permalink)

Fire damage and a fire loss can be repaired by a fire cleanup crew in a few short days and it is faster to contact the commercial fire damage company when the fire is still raging (After you have called Emergency Services first). Our fire damage repair crew will arrive on scene and immediately begin the process of repairing the home. There are fire problems you may not expect to be as severe as they actually are as well as other issues most homeowners don't even consider that have nothing to do with the actual fire. For example, if the Fire Department came to your house and had to use a hose to douse the flames you will have some amount of water damage.

Remember: Mitigation Over Replacing

  • Cost Effective. It is by far cheaper and easier to clean an item than it is to replace it. The Faster SERVPRO can respond to your damage the higher the chance we can save some of your personal items.
  • Preserve Air Quality. The longer ash and soot lingers in the air the more it becomes hazardous to your health. 
  • Keep The Smell Out. If SERVPRO can get to the scene soon after the damage occurs it is possible to prevent the permanent smell of burning from seeping into clothes and furniture.
  • Prevent Mold. If water was poured onto the fire it stands to reason it soaked your floors and appliances. Left untreated it becomes a perfect breeding ground for mold. 
  • Save Time. Believe it or not the longer a damage sits it becomes worse, even if you think its as bad as its going to get. The worse a job is the longer it takes to clean up. Still, it is always faster to repair than it is to build anew. 
  • Peace of Mind. The faster your life gets back to normal the less amount of stress is put on your body and mind. Fewer days laying awake at night in a place that isn't your own. Less stress equals a healthier and happier life. You can also rest assured the job was/is being done properly so there are no issues down the line because of cutting corners.

When you have a fire damage it feels like your life is going up in flames. Breath (just not in the smoke). SERVPRO of Friendswood/Pearland will come to the rescue and do what we do best. Make it "Like it never even happened." or better! Give us a call 281-412-6211

How To Inspect A Fire Extinguisher

2/8/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage How To Inspect A Fire Extinguisher Pro Tip: You can purchase a small fire extinguisher for around $30

When was the last time you took time to check the fire extinguisher that sits under your kitchen sink? Or the one hanging from a dusty hook in your garage? If you’re struggling to remember, it’s time to check it. Like any other piece of safety equipment, a home fire extinguisher should be inspected regularly to ensure it’s in proper working condition. A fire extinguisher in good working condition is your first line of defense when a home fire erupts.

Ideally, you should inspect your portable home fire extinguishers every month.

For the visual guide click here.

Tips for Performing a Monthly Fire Extinguisher Check

Check the label or tag.

Every fire extinguisher, whether disposable or rechargeable, has a manufacturer’s label or tag. Read the tag and follow the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance suggestions.

Check the tamper seal.

If the tamper seal has been broken or is cracked, a disposable fire extinguisher needs to be replaced. If it’s rechargeable, it needs to be serviced professionally. Check the locking or pull pin as well to make sure it’s in the correct position. If the pin missing, the fire extinguisher needs to be inspected or serviced by a professional.

Inspect for physical damage.

Physically inspect the fire extinguisher for obvious damage. This may include but is not limited to dents, corrosion, cracks and obvious leakage. If a fire extinguisher has leakage, it’s no longer under full pressure and may not work properly when you need it most. Check the fire extinguisher nozzle as well, to ensure it’s not clogged by grime, dust, bugs or leakage from the unit itself.

Check the pressure gauge.

Check that the pressure gauge needle indicates the fire extinguisher pressure is in the optimum operating range. Often the correct pressure range will be designated by green on the gauge.

Is the fire extinguisher full?

During your monthly check, lift the fire extinguisher and determine if it still feels full. If there has been a leak, it will feel light, and it won’t have the right amount of pressure to work correctly.

Shake it.

If you have a dry chemical fire extinguisher, it should be shaken once a month during your inspection. This helps prevent the chemical dousing agent from solidifying at the bottom of the unit.

Write inspection date on tag.

Keep track of every inspection date by writing it on the fire extinguisher tag.

Ensure easy access to your fire extinguisher.

Fire extinguishers should always be easy to access if there is an emergency. You don’t want to have to search for it once a fire breaks out. Don’t block fire extinguishers with furniture, boxes or any other items. Everyone who lives in the household should know where the closest fire extinguisher is located and how to use it in case of an emergency.

In the event of a fire emergency, first make sure to get people safely away, then call 911. A home fire extinguisher can be used to put out or control small fires, but it’s still safest to call professional fire fighters before you attempt to control a fire on your own. If you need professional fire, smoke and water damage cleanup and remediation after a fire, call the experts at SERVPRO of Friendswood/Pearland. 281-412-6211

Grill Safety

1/30/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Grill Safety Did you know you can tell the tenderness of a steak by comparing it to the firmness of your palm when you touch your thumb to any other finger?

The smell of BBQ in the air is a Texas trademark that happens near year-round. During the summer there is nothing better than going outside on a nice day with friends and family to grill burgers or in the fall roasting marshmallows over Dad's old foreman. This all providing you do it safely. To make sure you don't burn the steaks, here is a quick guide so you can continue the Texas tradition of making outdoor cuisine. 

The Do’s and Don’ts of grill safety:

Do:

  • Keep your grill at least ten feet away from your house
  • Make sure to keep your grill clean
  • Always check for gas leaks
  • Make sure to keep decorations or anything that may be flammable up away from your grill
  • In the case of flare-ups, it is good to keep a spray bottle of water near your grill
  • Always keep a fire hydrant handy

Don't:

  • Never turn your gas on when the lid is shut
  • Do not leave your grill unattended
  • Never use your grill inside your home
  • Do not Grill underneath a tree
  • Be cautious to not wear loose clothing when grilling as it could catch on fire. A 'Kiss the Cook' apron is ideal.

Tip: If you are using a propane tank and there is a leak, once you turn the tank on you will be able to see bubbles forming around the hose.

What To Do In Case Of Fire

1/30/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage What To Do In Case Of Fire Learn what you and your family should do if a fire starts in your home.

In The Same Room As A Fire

**Please do not stay in the same room as the fire if you do not feel comfortable or confident in your ability to control it. Evacuate Immediately and call 911 to alert the professionals**

Kitchen-

  • Grease: Turn off the burner. Grab a non-glass lid or baking sheet for the pot/pan and place over the fire while wearing oven mitts.
  • Oven: Smother the fire by throwing baking soda or salt onto it. Do NOT use similar products such as flour. It could cause an explosion.

General Room-

  • Electrical: If you can reach the cord safely, unplug it. Using a heavy blanket or baking soda, you can smolder the fire if it is small. Do NOT use water as it may worsen or cause a shock.
  • General: Use a Fire Extinguisher if you have one available. For a guide on how to use an extinguisher please see our SERVPRO video. ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFifToYGgto&feature=youtu.be )

Don’t Overload Your Room’s Electrical Outlets.

12/14/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Don’t Overload Your Room’s Electrical Outlets. Don't use too many multi-plug devices.

Overloaded circuit warning signs:

  • Flickering, blinking, or dimming lights
  • Frequently tripped circuit breakers or blown fuses
  • Warm or discolored wall plates
  • Cracking, sizzling, or buzzing from receptacles
  • Burning order coming from receptacles or wall switches
  • Mild shock or tingle from appliances, receptacles, or switches

How to prevent electrical overloads:

  • Never use extension cords or multi-outlet converters for appliances
  • All major appliances should be plugged directly into a wall receptacle outlet. Only plug one heat-producing appliance into a receptacle outlet at a time
  • A heavy reliance on extension cords is an indication that you have too few outlets to address your needs. Have a qualified electrician inspect your home and add new outlets
  • Power strips only add additional outlets; they do not change the amount of power being received from the outlet

Have Questions? Call Us Today – (281) 412-6211

AVOID HOLIDAY MISHAPS

10/13/2016 (Permalink)

Fire Damage AVOID HOLIDAY MISHAPS Wood-burning fireplace keeps you nice and cozy!

The winter season is fast approaching! The days are getting shorter and the temperatures are getting lower here in Southeast Texas. It’s almost time to start breaking out the portable space heaters and firing up those fireplaces and wood burning stoves.

Did you know?

According to the National Fire Protection Association, heating equipment is responsible for an estimated $893 million in property damage annually? Heating is the second leading cause of residential-fire deaths. Those of us here at SERVPRO of Friendswood/Pearland, in conjunction with the NFPA have put together a few tips to reduce the risk of a heating-related fire and to keep your homes and families safe this winter.

  • Keep anything flammable at least three feet from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or a portable space heater. Have a three-foot “kid & pet-free zone” around open fires and space heaters.
  • Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.
  • Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters.
  • Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cool before putting them in a metal container for disposal. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home.
  • Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional.
  • Have a qualified professional install stationary space heating equipment, water heaters or central heating equipment according to the local codes and manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Test smoke alarms monthly and replace after 10 years.

If you or someone you know has fire damage in your home, large or small, call Kimberly at 281-520-8197 for 24-hour service.  SERVPRO of Friendswood/Pearland is at your service. We’ll make it “Like it never happened.”

SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES: HERE’S WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW

10/6/2016 (Permalink)

Fire Damage SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES: HERE’S WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW Smoke alarms are a key part of a home fire escape plan.

There are two kinds of alarms. Ionization smoke alarms are quicker to warn about flaming fires. Photoelectric alarms are quicker to warn about smoldering fires. It is best to use both types of alarms in the home.

Install smoke alarms inside and outside each bedroom and sleeping area and make sure everyone in the home knows what to do if the alarm sounds.

Install alarms on every level of the home. Large homes may need extra smoke alarms.

It is best to use interconnected smoke alarms, when one smoke alarm sounds they all sound.

A smoke alarm should be on the ceiling or high on a wall. Keep smoke alarms away from the kitchen to reduce false alarms. They should be at least 10 feet from the stove.

People who are hard-of-hearing or deaf can use special alarms equipped with strobe lights and bed shakers.

Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years, and test the batteries once a month.

SERVPRO of Friendswood/Pearland knows the ins and outs of fire safety, but sometimes even the most safety-conscience can face tragedy. If you've had a fire damage in your home, large or small, call Kimberly at 281-520-8197 for 24-hour service.